linux

Sockets, CLOSE_WAIT, and You

I found this discussion about TCP sockets in Linux sitting around half-finished in Google Drive. It was dated 2012-10-23. I have no memory of writing it. I cleaned it up and am posting it here in case anyone finds it useful. A ‘socket’ is an abstraction for a network connection. Each machine has a socket it is communicating with; from an application’s perspective, sockets make it possible to treat a network connection much like a file on the local system, and just read from and write to it like any other file.
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Intel NUC, remote controls, and Fedora 22

I’ve had a fun time getting kodi to work with my new remote on an Intel NUC. So, in case you’re in a similar situation, here’s what worked for me! These instructions are for Fedora 22 and the hardware I linked to in this paragraph, but a lot of the instructions should be applicable in slightly different situations as well. Update your Intel NUC to the latest bios. At least on the RYH line, they fixed some problems with the IR receiver in a recent update.
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Desura - what Steam should have been

I like Steam. In a gaming world of ubiquitous DRM, Steam strikes a nice balance between functionality and nuisance. That is, Steam makes it dead simple to install and launch games, and the trade-off is that it does some fairly unobtrusive DRM. This is a good model, although I can think of several ways in which it could provide a better end-user experience.At the very top of my personal list of improvements to Steam would be “native Linux support”.
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BitTorrent, the Linux way

I use BitTorrent a lot. Most Linux distributions have torrents available, and I have gotten a lot of Creative Commons-licensed music, such as the work of Jonathan Coulton, via BitTorrent. It is a great way to deliver content.However, I have a problem with (most of) the available BitTorrent clients. Given what BitTorrent does, which is allow you to download and subsequently seed content, it should really run like a service - quietly running in the background handling your torrents.
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Tutorial: Creating OpenSim terrain with Blender

This tutorial will explain how to create RAW terrain files for OpenSim and Second Life using Blender and the Gimp.Before we beginYou will need the following software for this tutorial. All of this software is free and open source. Blender, a professional 3d modelling tool. Blender is powerful but complex, and basic blender knowledge is assumed for this tutorial. Blender will be used to actually create the heightmap. The Gimp, a powerful program for creating and editing raster (i.
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Twitter from the command line

I’ve recently started playing with twitter. A nice way to use it via the command-line (using curl) was suggested here. I have taken that and improved slightly on it.Here is the result:#!/bin/shecho -n “twitter> “read textwhile [ ${#text} -gt 140 ]; doechoecho “Message too long; used ${#text}/140 characters.“echoecho -n “twitter> “read textdoneechoecho “Message is ${#text}/140 characters. Press enter to post, or Ctrl+C to cancel.“readcurl –basic –user “username:password” –data-ascii “status=echo $text|tr ' ' '+'” “http://twitter.
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The Case of the Odd NetworkManager Behavior

I recently purchased an Eee PC 1000HE. This is a very nice machine, and aside from one weird bug, Linux support is great. However, I’ve run into a very annoying problem with Fedora 10, and at the root of that problem is gnome-keyring-manager.Misconfiguration Most FoulWe begin our tale with NetworkManager. Since I connect to several wireless networks and a VPN, NetworkManager is a very useful thing to have working. Its initial setup was great; I loaded nm-applet in my fluxbox startup, it prompted me for a default keyring password, and we were off.
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It is pitch black. You are likely to be flamed by a fanboy.

I feel the need to comment about this (and, subsequently, this and this).First, a summary, for those who get a case of the tl;dr’s. A woman bought a laptop to use for her coursework at a local college. She accidentally bought a Dell laptop with Ubuntu on it. When she realized her ISP’s setup disk wouldn’t work, she tried to get Dell to swap the laptop for one with Windows. The Dell representative apparently convinced her to keep the one she had.
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5 things I hate about Fedora 10

Every release of Fedora feels like a step in the wrong direction. I don’t say this lightly - I use Fedora at work and at home; it is my primary operating system. I have staunchly supported it in the face of critical Ubuntu fans for a while now.First, a little background. I switched to Fedora from a mixture of gentoo and slackware around the time I started my current job, since it was far easier to keep track of one package management toolset, and several things about gentoo’s packaging system had started to irk me.
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Paranoid Security: Establishing a Connection the Hard Way

Recently, I was describing the personal setup I use to connect to my home machine over on watchingback (a group that has gone unfortunately silent). This setup combines port-knocking (with one-time sequences), disk encryption, and passphrase-protected rsa keys. Here’s a basic rundown of how it works from an end-user perspective (i.e., once everything is set up):First, the user (me) inserts a USB flash drive with an encrypted partition. He mounts up the encrypted disk on a local machine (I’ll call this machine the ‘client’ throughout this article), providing the necessary password, and runs a script called ‘callhome’.
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